Report of future skills for an intelligent transport systems environment in 2035

NZ Transport Agency research report RR 639 – Technology related transport skill requirements and availability

This research report has been published on and is available for download from the Transport Agency website at www.nzta.govt.nz/resources/research/reports/639 .

Dr. Julian Williams Senior Economist at BERL, thanks those who are interested and have contributed to the research. He says BERL is interested in thoughts and comment on this work. This paper will be presented at the forthcoming New Zealand Association of Economists Conference 2018 in Auckland, June 2018.

Fusion Networks gets a strong mention about the Fusion Intern and Student programme.   7.7 Employer – education engagement

Business is showing leadership in addressing training needs and one example is provided by Fusion Networks (2017). It is getting directly involved in education by developing an intern programme.  This provides a career pathway to create future employees starting from assisting developing secondary school students interested in technology. This engagement between a private sector firm and the education sector has co-created learning programmes with two polytechnic institutes and a private teaching organisation. By combining practical skills training with a traditional education framework, it seeks to match practical learning with theory. Fusion Networks announces its internship pilot (Source: Fusion Networks 2017)

The Fusion IT Intern Pathway is a new innovative programme from Fusion, co-creating digital learning to prepare young people for the 21st century workforce.

It’s is a three-way partnership between Tamaki College, the first full digital learning secondary school in NZ, the Manaiakalani Education Trust, the award winning programme that’s transforming student’s education in low decile schools, and Fusion Networks. Kiwi IT company Fusion is used to solving complex IT issues with agile thinking. When Tamaki College challenged Fusion to find a way to help students build a career in technology, Fusion looked to change traditional academic learning with hands-on and practical focused workplace experience. The mix was a key factor for a company like Fusion, which had discovered that graduates that hit the workforce with hands-on practical experience are confident, and high performers in the workplace. 

Introduction to research report RR 639

This paper reports an assessment of skills gaps and training needs likely in 2035 for New Zealand, resulting from the technological change from implementation of intelligent transport systems (ITS) in land transport.Networks 

The research reported was funded by the New Zealand Transport Agency and conducted in 2017 in Wellington, New Zealand. The economics and engineering literature provides important insights into the impact of technological change on skills demanded and the consequences for occupations and training.

Accordingly, to develop the skills gap assessment, we first developed scenarios of future ITS environments in New Zealand in 2035. This was informed by global literature on ITS technologies and their likely implementation by 2035.

Paramount among these technologies were autonomous vehicles, where their level of autonomy and coverage of the national vehicle fleet by 2035, is a useful metric of the overall level of ITS development. We present the skills gap assessment in terms of relevant well-defined occupations prevailing in 2017.

 The occupations considered are: transport, ICT and public policy professionals; automotive technicians and other motor trades workers; and drivers. 

To indicate the quantum of skills gaps, the paper concludes with empirical projections of numbers of future occupations in demand under an ITS environment.

Publication details

  • Author: Julian Williams, Fiona Stokes, Hugh Dixon – Business and Economic Research Limited | Douglas Wilson, Prakash Ranjitkar, Sujith Padiyara, Bevan Clement, Puti Wilson – University of Auckland | Stephen Hewett – Beca
  • Published: March 2018
  • Reference: 639
  • ISBN/ISSN: 978-1-98-851293-8